You are here:News»News from the protected areas»Displaying items by tag: Management of Protected Areas

The Parco Naturale Prealpi Giulie is now recognized by UNESCO as a new Biosphere Reserve. Biosphere Reserves are designated by national governments and then recognized by UNESCO under its Man and the Biosphere (MAB) programme, which promotes sustainable development. Earlier this month, the MAB gave the park the status of a Biosphere Reserve, acknowledging the site’s natural value and the park’s activities associated to sustainability such its eco-museums. This internationally recognized status is only given to sites that are successful in connecting conservation, development, and learning. The president of the park, Andrea Beltrame, states that the park has been working since 2011 to earn this status and that it will help them with future actions aimed at reconnecting humans to nature. 

What is a Biosphere Reserve

Biosphere reserves are “Science for Sustainability support sites” where innovative approaches to sustainable development, resource management, and interactions between nature and society can be tested. They are places of reconciliation of natural and cultural diversity with economic and social development. 

Biosphere reserves are made up of three zones: 1. Core areas for the preservation of landscapes, ecosystems and biodiversity; 2. A Buffer zone which surrounds the core area and reinforces scientific research, monitoring, and education; and 3. A Transition area for economic and human development to take place in a way that is socio-culturally and ecologically sustainable. 

For more info: https://www.parcoprealpigiulie.it/view.aspx?id=ELE0005164&L=it

The Parc National des Ecrins was granted a spot on the International Union for Nature Conservation’s (IUCN) ‘Green List’ earlier this month during France’s Nature Congress (June 12th, 2019) in Marseille. The 'Green List’ Label gives international recognition to well-managed and well-governed protected areas and conservation sites. In order to obtain this status, the Parc National des Ecrins had to meet 17 environmental and social requirements under 4 themes: good governance, sound design and planning, effective management and positive conservation outcomes. Thierry Durand, who initiated the process of obtaining this label in 2016, sees this as an opportunity for the park to work on concrete projects in biodiversity especially in the context of climate change. The Parc National des Ecrins is now one of 46 parks worldwide with this recognition.

Source: http://www.ecrins-parcnational.fr/actualite/ecrins-accedent-liste-verte-uicn

About 80 hunters from the three regions Haute Savoie (France), Val d’Aosta (Italy) and Valais (Switzerland) met in Chamonix to share their experience about their respective hunting practices and to evaluate the impact of hunting on ecological connectivity in the transboundary area, which is one of the Working Regions of the ALPBIONET2030 project. This meeting, organized under the framework of ALPBIONET2030 project by the Hunters Federation of Upper-Savoie, was the first time for many of the participants to discover how hunting is managed in the other regions across the border. A lot of similarities but also several big differences could be assessed in wildlife management practices. The picture was completed by the presentation of Jonas Kahlen from Veterinary University of Vienna, who presented an overview of hunting practices in the Alpine countries and its effects on wildlife. Moreover, the impacts of other outdoor activities (skiing, paragliding, trail running, biking, etc…) on wildlife populations were analyzed in the afternoon. Concrete proposals for a closer cooperation on various issues and a regular exchange between the actors of wildlife management in the three countries were defined in a plenary discussion and the foundation for this reinforced collaboration was laid. The Final Conference of the ALPBIONET2030 project will take place in Chamonix on October 8th and 9th, 2019 and will be the occasion to report the progress made on this cooperation.

This was the emblematic title of the French Nature Reserves’ 38th Congress that was entirely dedicated to a new way of managing protected areas in order to adapt to climate change.
When it comes to climate change the Alps are particularly effected. The French Nature Reserve (RNF) Congress, that took place in Le-Mônetier-les-Bains/Serre-Chevalier (France), carried out an extensive program over four days (from June 4th - 8th, 2019), starting with the official launch of the European project Pitem Biodivalp and concluding with on-site visits to surrounding protected areas.
The Congress had a technical approach with the general objective of raising awareness and inciting participants to take on the issues of climate change and its effects through managing protected areas in an innovative and climate resilient way.


During the Congress, the General Assembly of RNF took place allowing all the network members to discuss internal issues. Moreover, field activities to discover biodiversity in the nearby protected areas along with their climate change adapted management were organised. All of the outcomes of the conference were presented in a closing plenary opened to all participants.
Alparc took an active role in the session dedicated to exchanges within protected area networks and the RNF. It also attended the thematic session in order to enhance its knowledge on climate change and to gather some useful information on the degree of adaptation that can be implemented in protected areas.


Under the pression of the global phenomenon, protected areas have a fundamental role to play - enhancing nature as a strong measure to adapt to climate change.

 

More information at:  https://congres-reserves-naturelles-de-france.fr/

Mont Avic Natural Park, as part of the 30th anniversary of its foundation, promoted a study day entitled "Management of protected areas and ecosystem services - interactions and synergies with EMAS" dedicated to analyzing the synergies between the planning tools of protected areas, ecosystem services and EMAS (Eco Management and Audit Scheme). The event was sponsored by the Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale (ISPRA) and the Comitato per l'Ecolabel e l'Ecoaudit, who is responsible for issuing EMAS registration in Italy.

The day featured a discussion on the quantification of ecosystem services, a complex process that requires a multidisciplinary approach due to the variety of services it provides and for its multidimensional value. This discussion was held in light of the concept ‘Ecosystem Services Payment’, first introduced into Italian national legislation in 2015 and whose beneficiaries include municipalities, protected areas and organizations that work in the collective management of common goods.

The evaluations concerning ecosystem services are of great relevance in protected areas. Mont Avic Natural Park, together with Gran Paradiso National Park and other protected areas, were recently involved in a test action, promoted by Federparchi and ISPRA. The goal of this action was to recognize EMAS registration as an objective tool contributing to the maintenance and provision of ecosystem services. Its results were presented during the study day and will later be published as part of the 2019 annual update of the EMAS Environmental Declaration, available on the EMAS page of the institutional website.

During the day, the Mont Avic Natural Park also presented the contents of the new Spatial Management Plan, which came into force in 2018, and explicitly recognizes the Environmental Management System (according to EMAS Regulation) as an operational tool.

The event ended with a viewing of the video "Summary of the EMAS 2018-2021 Environmental Declaration of the Mont Avic Natural Park", available here on YouTube. The video won ‘best multimedia product’ on May 25th, during the EMAS Italia 2019 Awards.

To request guest speakers’ speeches from the event, please write to: info@montavic.it.

Monday, 15 July 2019 09:00

European Parks Academy 2019 Seminars

European Parks Academy will be organizing 3 seminars from July 15th- 21st

Seminar A World Heritage Sites and Sustainable Tourism: Tourism presents itself as both an opportunity and a challenge for protected areas and World Heritage Sites. This seminar will focus on touristic regulations and recommendations of the World Heritage Convention along with practical tools to for sustainable management of tourism flows.

Seminar B Ecological Monitoring and innovative technologies: This seminar will include training for the latest technological innovations in wildlife and vegetation monitoring such as smartphone apps and remote-sensing based change detection.

Seminar C Transboundary Protected Areas and Successful: Learning how to find common approaches and meet the challenges of intercultural communication along with existing cooperation models and their benefits.

The complete program can be found online here.

The quiet off-season and welcoming Bavarian village of Balderschwang was the host of ALPARC’s latest Council meeting on April 12th and 13th 2019.

The official launch of ALPARC’s new regional platform, ALPARC Centr’alps, was the main topic of the first session of the meeting. The new platform’s aim is to be closer to the protected areas located in the central Alps, to develop new and innovative projects and exchanges and to increase the involvement of new members.

The second session of the meeting was dedicated to the discussions on ALPARC’s overall programme and how to enhance new projects, especially in regards to which strategic positions should be taken on several international guiding topics (as Climate Change, etc). The schedule was thus divided into a general roundtable discussion on ALPARC’s strategy. Two thematic workshops were organized : one focusing on the elaboration of the 2020-2022 ALPARC programme, and the other on a common event to celebrate the ALPARC’s 25th anniversary project within the framework of 2020 IUCN Conference in Marseille.

The next ALPARC council meeting will be held on September 12th and 13th, 2019, in Zernez, Switzerland.

Climate Change is threatening our planet. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s ‘Special Report’, if global temperatures rise above 1.5 °C (above pre-industrial levels) we will face extreme climate events, a substantial increase in biodiversity loss, and difficulties gathering fresh water.

 

Climate Change in the Alps
The situation in the Alpine region is even more alarming, with rising temperatures about “twice as large as the global trend” (Brunetti et al., 2009). Furthermore, climate change’s effects are three time stronger in the Alps than the world’s average (OECD, 2007) and gathering fresh water is becoming an increasingly urgent issue. Over 90 percent of glacier volume in the Alps could be lost by 2100. Ice melting has become a symbol of climate change in the Alps, since it is the most visible and easily measured effect of climate change and due to the glaciers’ high importance for the region’s landscapes, ecosystems and economy. ‘The Cryosphere’ review envisages two alarming scenarios in which, depending on the increase in global temperatures, Alpine glaciers may or may not survive. 
Alpine States are committed to climate change action and have adopted the Alpine Convention’s ‘Declaration on Climate Change’ (2006) and ‘Action Plan on Climate Change in the Alps’ (2009).   Since 2011, “taking action on climate change” has been one of the priorities set during the ‘Multi-Annual Work Programme of the Alpine Conference’. This brought about the establishment of the Alpine Climate Board in 2016, which coordinates all climate change-related activities.

 

Concrete actions in Alpine protected areas

Several Alpine protected areas are carrying out concrete actions to deal with the effects of climate change which mainly consist in monitoring and research, adaptation and mitigation measures, promotion, educational activities and dissemination of relevant information to the general public.


In France, the project Alpages sentinelles, started in 2000, studies and measures the effects of climate change on 31 Alpine pastures. The project’s goal is to develop adaptation measures to preserve the traditional pastoral activity in the Alps. It involves the Ecrins National Park, Vanoise National Park, Mercantour National Park, Chartreuse Nature Regional Park, Vercors Nature Regional Park, and Luberon Nature Regional Park. The partners of Alpage sentinelles met last March to analyse the results of 2018 - the warmest year ever recorded since the launch of the project. They agreed that the most effective measure is to manage the Alpine pastures in a way that avoids further stress on the grasslands. Indeed, pastures are already feeling the effects of increasing temperatures, resulting in the depletion of vegetation.
In the same direction, the National Park of Ecrins and the National Park Gran Paradiso launched the LIFE project PastorAlp. Based on a consistent activity of transboundary research, the final output of the project consists of developing a platform of tools to facilitate the adoption of climate change adaptation strategies in the two parks.

 

3pnv006188 Renoncule des glaciers. Au 2e plan les Roches Blanches au fd. de g. à dr. Col des Léchours Pointe des Léchours Col du Pelvo Roux e

 

The Interreg Alcotra CClimaTT project involves transborder protected areas from France and Italy. The objectives of the project include:  gathering more knowledge and understanding of climate change effects; involving and informing the general public; and influencing people’s behaviour toward greater environmental responsibility. Within this framework, the Ente Aree Protette Alpi Marittime and National Park of Ecrins, offered 40,000 euros to eight projects, selected by a jury of experts, that promote a resilient and climate-smart future under the motto “If climate changes… we change as well!”. The winners will implement activities for the mitigation and adaptation to climate change in Alpine areas.


The Festival scientifique “Avec ou sans Glace” is an example of a series of activities held to inform the general public on the effect of climate change in the Alps with specific reference to glaciers melting. The conference organised by the National Park of Vanoise (France) included a ‘geological hike’ to discover the impact of the melting glaciers and a conference where climate change experts interacted with the public.

Apart from informing the general public, protected areas play a key role in carrying out educational activities on climate change effects. For example, the Natural Park of Adamello (Italy), together with a local high school, organised outdoor activities dedicated to pupils under the Interreg project YOUrALPS: The trees in the Alps as a signal of climate change. Students were guided by experts to discover the effects of climate change on forests to better understand the changing ecosystem. In Austria, still under the YOUrALPS project, educational activities were carried out in the Nature Park Geschriebenstein where high school students were confronted with the issue of extreme weather events caused by climate change. During on-field activities, they experimented with climate change adaptation and mitigation measures against floods.

In Slovenia, the Triglav National Park is part of the Julian Alps Biosphere Reserve. This initiative is an intergovernmental research programme that establishes a global network of biosphere reserves. This network strives to uphold the balance between people and nature, biodiversity and sustainable development and upkeep of cultural values. This is a great example of the enhancement of an active ‘sink’ of GHGs, which is a strong mitigation measure against climate change.

Moreover, the Berchtesgaden National Park, in Bavaria, is involved in different climate monitoring activities. One of these activities is the Klimamessnetz (Climate monitoring network).  It relies on the National park service and the German weather service to track the changes in Alpine climate in the long run and in a large area. Moreover, the National Park is one of GLORIA-EUROPE research sites whose goal is to understand future scenarios we will have to face due to climate change.

Climate Change is producing severe effects on the Alps, but protected areas are fighting to resist.


Protected areas actions:


Alpages sentinelles


Pastoralp LIFE Project


Festival scientifique “Avec ou sans Glace”


Triglav National Park, the Julian Alps Biosphere Reserve


Klimamessnetz


If climate changes… We change as well!


The trees in the Alps as a signal of climate change


“Draußen unterrichten“– Biodiversity Strategies


We are Alps


Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments

 

Bibliography

Brunetti et al., 2009, ‘Climate variability and change in the Greater Alpine Region over the last two centuries based on multi-variable analysis’, in International Journal of Climatology

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2018, ‘Special Report: Global Warming of 1.5 ºC’, as seen in https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/, 25-04-2019

NASA, 2019, ‘Responding to Climate Change’ as seen in https://climate.nasa.gov/solutions/adaptation-mitigation/, 26-04-2019

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, 2007, ‘Climate Change in the European Alps: Adapting Winter Tourism and Natural Hazards Management’, ed. Shardul Agrawala

Zekollari et al., 2019, ‘Modelling the future evolution of glaciers in the European Alps under the EURO-CORDEX RCM ensemble’, in The Cryosphere, volume 13, pp. 1125-1146

Published in News from the Alps

On Thursday April 11th, 2019, the new regional platform of the Alpine network ALPARC CENTR’ALPS was officially founded in Balderschwang, Nagelfluhkette Nature Park (DE).  Directly linked by contract to the ALPARC network, the new platform has an association status based on German law. 

The creation of a regional platform is based on the decisions of ALPARC’s last three General Assemblies, who decided to put in place a decentralized structure of ALPARC to guarantee concrete work on the ground, a closer proximity towards the managers of the protected areas and local initiatives. ALPARC CENTR’ALPS shares the same objectives and working axes of its “mother organization” and represents a concrete possibility for smaller protected areas and local managers of biodiversity and natural sites to join the network.  Thanks to ALPARC CENTR’ALPS there will be an opportunity to gain access to more of the EU’s funding for the central region. 

The 10 founding members include protected areas from Germany, Austria, Switzerland, the Swiss Park Network, the Federation of the Austrian Nature Park and the interactive natural museum Inatura located in Dornbin, Germany. The presidency of ALPARC CENTR’ALPS is assured by Peter Oggier, the current president of ALPARC and director of the Nature Park Pfyn-Finges

To insure a regional presence of the Alpine network with regional contact points and to guarantee the proximity to the protected areas, ALPARC is planning to create a second regional platform in the south-eastern Alps (East of Italy or Slovenia). This will strengthen the network’s activities.

List of the 10 founding members of the ALPARC CENTR'ALPS:

 

The 25th Edition of the Danilo Re Memorial – the trophy of the Alpine Protected Areas, will take place on January 16th-19th 2020 in Mittersill, HoheTauern National Park, Salzburg ,Austria. 

The event will host, as usual, the ALPARC General Assembly. It will be held on January 17th, 2020. All the ALPARC members are invited to participate.

Further information will be available in autumn on the Memorial Danilo Re website and on Facebook

Published in Events of ALPARC